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Self Delusion

Are we willing to be objective regarding ourselves?  Can we be truly authentic?
Truth about one’s self can be derived by disinterested self observation through self reflection and meditation.  Knowing the truth allows better, more authentic interaction with the world.  The common inclination of humans is self delusion and judgement for the sake of expediency and decreased anxiety.  

1. We are wrong far more often than we believe.
    We can go to extremes to avoid internal inconsistencies. 
    Even embracing falsehood.

2. We are much less objective with evidence than we believe.  
    Few people escape bias and the strong tendency to rationalize
    dearly held  beliefs.

3. We deflect responsibility for being wrong.  
    We are highly motivated to protect our self image.

4. Our expectations are not objective and are unrealistic.  
    We suffer from optimism bias.

5. We are going to die.  
    It is the most certain and the least believed.

6. Conflicts with two people or groups are more often issues of values than arguments of what is absolute truth.

7. Our beliefs are determined by our wishes, not truth.  We believe in things that we want to be true even if there is evidence to the contrary or absence of evidence.

8. Our desire to resolve anxiety caused by uncertainty causes a leap to conclusions that are unsupported.  The need to avoid anxiety can exceed the consequence of a negative outcome.

9. Enormous energy is expended with the single goal of reducing anxiety.

Derived from the work of Alex Lickerman, MD.  
Read more in
The Undefeated Mind:  On the Science of Constructing an Indestructible Self

Photo by Dave Hutt, www.dmddigitalphoto.com


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